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Office Hours

Monday                                        10am – 7pm
Tuesday – Thursday                     8am – 5pm
Friday                                              7am – 3pm
Saturday                                                 Closed
Sunday                                                    Closed

Call Us : 956-305-5795
Visit Us : 5201 N G St, McAllen, TX, 78504

Keratoconus service image
QUESTION:

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus is an eye condition in which the cornea weakens and thins over time, causing the development of a cone-like bulge and optical irregularity of the cornea. Keratoconus can result in significant visual loss and may lead to corneal transplant in severe cases.

How is progressive keratoconus treated?

Keratoconus can be treated using iLink™—the first and only FDA-approved cross-linking procedure that slows or halts progressive keratoconus to help preserve vision.

Limits Progression
of Keratoconus
FDA Approved
Insurance Reimbursement

What is Corneal Cross-Linking?

Cross-linking is a minimally invasive outpatient procedure for the treatment of progressive keratoconus. iLink FDA-approved cross-linking combines the use of prescription eye drops, Photrexa® Viscous (riboflavin 5’-phosphate in 20% dextran ophthalmic solution), Photrexa® (riboflavin 5’-phosphate ophthalmic solution), and ultra-violet A (UVA) light from the KXL® system to create new collagen cross-links and leads to the stiffening of the cornea. The goal of the procedure is to stiffen the cornea to slow or prevent further progression of the condition and preserve your vision.

A new standard of care for progressive keratoconus

iLink™ corneal cross-linking is an innovative therapy that has transformed the treatment of progressive keratoconus. This minimally invasive outpatient procedure uses Photrexa® (riboflavin 5’-phosphate in 20% dextran ophthalmic solution) and Photrexa® (riboflavin 5’-phosphate ophthalmic solution) and Photrexa® Viscous riboflavin eye drops, combined with ultraviolet light from the KXL system to:

  • Create new corneal collagen cross-links
  • Shorten and thicken collagen fibrils
  • Stiffen and strengthen the cornea
  • Slows or prevents further progression of the condition and preserve your vision

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Ultra-Violet A (UVA) light?

UVA is one of the three types of invisible light rays given off by the sun (together with ultra-violet B and ultra-violet C) and is the weakest of the three.

Does corneal cross-linking require removal of the epithelium?

Yes, your doctor will apply topical anesthesia to numb the eye prior to the removal of the epithelium. This process helps to prepare your eye so that the drug can penetrate the tissue of the cornea to have an effective cross-linking procedure.

Will I need to be out of my contact lenses for this process?

Yes. Typically, patients are asked by their doctor to stop wearing hard contact lenses prior to surgery for a period of several weeks. Once treated, patients will not be allowed back into contact lenses for one month.

Am I awake during the procedure?

Yes, typically you will be awake during the treatment. You may be given medication to help you relax and numbing anesthetic drops.

How long does the treatment take?

The actual procedure takes about an hour, but you will be at the office for approximately two hours to allow sufficient time for preparation and recovery before you return to the comfort of your own home.

Does it hurt?

There is some discomfort during immediate recovery but usually not during the treatment. Immediately following treatment, a bandage contact lens is placed on the surface of the eye to protect the newly treated area. After the numbing drops wear off, there is some discomfort, often described as a gritty, burning sensation managed with Tylenol and artificial tears. If pain is severe, oral narcotic medications may be used.

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